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A Consumer's Guide to Wisconsin Farm-Raised Fish

III.  Nutritional/Health Benefits Of Eating Wisconsin Farm-raised Fish

A. American Heart Association Recommendations
B. FDA/EPA Consumer Advisory

C. Nutritional Benefits 

D. Nutritional Data

                                       


III. Nutritional/Health Benefits of Eating Wisconsin Farm-Raised Fish

Fish can be an important part of a balanced diet. Eating Wisconsin farm-raised fish provides high quality protein, omega-3 fatty acids and many of the minerals and vitamins beneficial to fueling a healthy body.  Below, we summarize several dietary recommendations and highlight some of the benefits of including fish in a person’s diet.


A. American Heart Association Recommendation (1)

The American Heart Association recommends eating fish (particularly fatty fish) at least two times (two servings) a week. Each serving is 3.5 ounce cooked, or about ¾ cup of flaked fish. Enjoy fish baked or grilled, not fried.  Choose low-sodium, low-fat seasonings such as spices, herbs, lemon juice and other flavorings in cooking and at the table.

 

Fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines and albacore tuna are high in two- kinds of omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahezaenoic acid (DHA), which have demonstrated benefits at reducing heart disease.

 

B. FDA/EPA Consumer Advisory (2004) (2)

1.      Key Parts of the Advisory:

 

Fish and shellfish are an important part of a healthy diet. Fish and shellfish contain high quality protein and other essential nutrients, are low in saturated fat and contain omega-3 fatty acids. A well balanced diet that includes a variety of fish and shellfish can contribute to heart health and children's proper growth and development. Thus, women and young children in particular should include fish or shellfish in their diets due to the many nutritional benefits.

 

2.   General Dietary Advice:

 

FDA recommends that consumers eat a balanced diet, choosing a variety of foods including fruits and vegetables, foods that are low in trans fat and saturated fat, as well as foods rich in high fiber grains and nutrients. Fish and shellfish can be an important part of this diet.

 

C. Nutritional Benefits

1.      Seafood is a good source of high-quality protein, is low in saturated fat, and is rich in many vitamins and minerals. (3)

 

2.      Besides containing protein and other nutrients such as vitamin D and selenium, fish (either finfish or shellfish) contain a specific type of fat, omega-3 fatty acids, that may reduce the risk of developing heart disease and other medical problems. (4)

 

3.      Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish especially oily fish such as salmon, sardines, and herring. These omega-3 fatty acids can help lower your blood pressure, lower your heart rate, and improve other cardiovascular risk factors.(4)

 

4.      Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids decrease risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats), which can lead to sudden cardiac death. Omega-3 fatty acids also decrease triglyceride levels, slow the growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque and lower blood pressure (slightly). (1)

 

5.      Eating fish reduces the risk of death from heart disease, the leading cause of death in both men and women.  Fish intake has also been linked to a lower risk of stroke, depression, and mental decline with age.(4)

 

6.      For pregnant women, mothers who are breastfeeding, and women of childbearing age, fish intake is important because it supplies DHA, a specific omega-3 fatty acid that is beneficial for the brain development of infants.(4)

 

7.      Infants whose mother consumed EPA and DHA during pregnancy may gain benefits such as longer gestation and better vision and brain development.(3)

 

8.    Other benefits of seafood may include:

         relief of inflammation and symptoms caused by rheumatoid arthritis,

 

         relief of psoriasis and eczema symptoms, and

 

         reduction of symptoms from dry eye syndrome.(5)

 


 

D. Nutritional Data for Fish Commonly Eaten In Wisconsin



Serving size and nutritional

information adjusted to 100g

 

 

Species

 

Serving Size

 

Calories

 

Total Fat

 

Saturated Fat

Mono-

unsaturated

fat

Poly-

unsaturated

Fat

 

Omega- 3

 

Omega- 6

 

Protein

 

Cholesterol

(cooked, dry heat)

(g)

 #

%DV

(g)

%DV

(g)

%DV

(g)

(g)

(mg)

(mg)

(g)

%DV

(mg)

%DV

Bass

(Mixed species, freshwater)

100

146

8%

4.7

8%

1.0

5%

1.8

0.1

1013

112

24.2

48%

86.9

29%

Perch

(Mixed Species)

100

117

7%

0.1

2%

0.2

2%

0.2

0.4

374

14

24.8

50%

115.0

39%

Pike

(Northern)

100

113

6%

0.9

1%

0.1

1%

0.2

0.3

182

41

24.7

50%

50.0

17%

Salmon

(Atlantic, farm-raised)

100

206

10%

12.4

19%

2.5

12%

4.4

4.4

2260

666

22.1

44%

62.9

21%

Sunfish

 (Pumpkinseed)

100

114

5%

0.8

3%

0.3

0%

0.3

0.3

194

19

24.9

49%

85.9

30%

Tilapia

100

128

7%

2.5

4%

1.1

4%

1.1

0.7

240

300

26.1

54%

57.1

18%

Trout

(Mixed Species)

100

190

10%

8.5

13%

0.1

8%

4.2

1.9

1369

224

26.6

53%

74.0

24%

Trout

 (Rainbow, farm-raised)

100

169

8%

7.2

11%

2.1

10%

2.1

2.4

1235

949

24.2

48%

68.0

23%

Walleye Pike

100

119

6%

1.5

2%

0.3

2%

0.4

0.6

465

33

24.5

49%

109.7

36%



 

Source:

http//nutritiondata.self.com (5)

 
 

A Consumer’s Guide for Wisconsin Farm-Raised Fish

Section 3

 
 

 

Read On To Section IV. The Safety of Wisconsin, Farm Raised Fish... 



Resources

 
Wisconsin Aquaculture Association (WAA):
 
University of Wisconsin- Stevens Point – Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility (NADF):
http://aquaculture.uwsp.edu
 
The National Aquaculture Association (NAA)
 
 
 

References

 

(1) American Heart Association. “Fish 101.[Online] Available 2010.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/Fish-101_UCM_305986_Article.jsp


 

American Heart Association. “Frequently Asked Questions About Fish.[Online] Available 2010.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/General/Frequently-Asked-Questions-About-

Fish_UCM_306451_Article.jsp

 

(2) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Factsheet “Consumption Advice: Joint Federal Advisory for Mercury in Fish” [Online] Available (2010). http://water.epa.gov/scitech/swguidance/fishshellfish/outreach/factsheet.cfm

 

(3) National Academy of Sciences, Nesheim, Malden C. and Yaktine, Ann L., ed. Seafood Choices: Balancing Benefits and Risks.” Washington D.C.: National Academies Press, 2007.

“Free Executive Summary. [Online] Available (2010).

http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11762

 

“Report Brief.” [Online] Available (2010). http://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2006/Seafood-Choices-Balancing-Benefits- and-Risks/11762_SeafoodChoicesReportBrief.ashx

 

“Fact Sheet.” [Online] Available (2010).

http://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2006/Seafood-Choices-Balancing-Benefits-

and-Risks/11762_SeafoodChoicesFactSheet.pdf

(4) JAMA. The Journal of the American Medical Association. Torpy, Janet M. MD; Glass, Richard M. MD ed. “Eating Fish:  Health Benefits and Risks.” JAMA Patient Page 2006; 296(15):1926.  [Online]

Available (2010). http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/296/15/1926

 

(5) National Fisheries Institute “Health Benefits & Science of Seafood:  [Online] Available.

http://www.aboutseafood.com/sites/all/files/share/Human_body_foldout.pdf

“Downloadable Resources.[Online] Available (2010).  http://www.aboutseafood.com/health-

nutrition/downloadable-resources

(6)NutritionData.com Interactive Website: [Online] Available (2010). http://nutritiondata.self.com/

 

USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page [Online] Available (2010).

http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00

 

 

Developed and compiled by:

Wisconsin Aquaculture Association

UW Stevens Point – Northern Aquaculture Demonstration

Facility

UW-Extension Aquaculture Outreach

And the

Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and

Consumer Protection

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